MPs debate knife crime e-petition



View the petition and the Government response:

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/233926

Read the Commons Library research briefing on knife crime

https://researchbriefings.parliament.uk/ResearchBriefing/Summary/SN00330

Why is this petition being debated?

The Petitions Committee has the power to schedule debates on e-petitions in the House of Commons Second Chamber, Westminster Hall.

In deciding which petitions should be debated, it takes into account how many people have signed the petition, the topicality of the issue raised, whether the issue has recently been debated in Parliament, and the breadth of interest among MPs.

What will the petition debate achieve?

Debates on petitions in Westminster Hall are general debates about the issues raised by the petition.

MPs can discuss the petition and, if they wish, ask questions about the Government’s position on the issue or press the Government to take action.

A Government Minister takes part in the debate and answers the points raised.

These debates help to raise the profile of a campaign and could influence decision-making in Government and Parliament.

Petition debates in Westminster Hall cannot directly change the law or result in a vote to implement the request of the petition.

Creating new laws, or changing existing ones, can only be done through the parliamentary legislative process which involves a number of debates, and detailed consideration of the law in draft, in both the House of Commons and the House of Lords.

This process is normally started by the Government, although there are some ways in which individual MPs or members of the House of Lords who are not in the Government (known as "backbenchers") can ask Parliament to consider new laws.

Breaking down barriers thanks to the Disability Discrimination Act #YourStoryOurHistory



Adi shares his experience of living with Retinitis pigmentosa and what it was like to lose 95% of his vision from the age of 12. Without the Disability Discrimination Act 1995, Adi would not have been able to stand up to discrimination in the workplace.

Changing society’s view of mental health following the Equality Act #YourStoryOurHistory



“ I can see the shift in people beginning to understand people’s differences.”

Becky shares her experience of living with Bipolar disorder and how she feels society’s view of mental health is changing for the better because of the Equality Act 2010.

Rights for people with disabilities: Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act #YourStoryOurHistory



The Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970 was the first piece of legislation in the world to recognise and give rights to people with disabilities.

Nancy shares how the Act was a huge step forward to achieving greater equality for disabled people.

Prime Minister's Questions: 20 March 2019 - Article 50 period, Brexit, hate crime and more



https://www.parliament.uk/business/news/2019/march/prime-ministers-questions-20-march-2019/

Question Time in the House of Commons is an opportunity for MPs to question government ministers about matters for which they are responsible.

Prime Minister's Question Time, also referred to as PMQs, takes place every Wednesday that the House of Commons is sitting and gives MPs the chance to put questions to the Prime Minister.

In most cases, the session starts with a routine 'open question' from an MP about the Prime Minister's engagements. MPs can then ask supplementary questions on any subject, often one of current political significance.

The Leader of the Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn asks six questions and the leader of the second largest opposition party asks two.

You can follow https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber.

House of Commons debate on extension of Article 50



Now MPs are considering extending Article 50.

Article 50 of the 2009 Lisbon Treaty sets out how a member state leaves the European Union, with a two year period between the member state "triggering" the Article and the day that the state leaves the Union.

The UK Government triggered Article 50 on 29 March 2017 so is due to leave the European Union on 29 March 2019. If the Article 50 period is extended, the UK would remain a member of the European Union during this period.

Find out more: https://www.parliament.uk/business/news/2019/march/house-of-commons-to-vote-on-article-50-extension/

Hearts and Minds: The Great Suffrage Pilgrimage of 1913 by Jane Robinson



Jane Robinson is a writer and lecturer specialising in social history through women’s eyes. This talk is based on her 10th book, Hearts and Minds; she is also the author of the acclaimed ‘Bluestockings’ and ‘In the Family Way.

This talk was part of Women's History Month 2018

International Women's Day lecture 'A Woman's Work' by Rt Hon Harriet Harman MP



Introduction by Helen Pankhurst, Advisor to CARE International, and the great-granddaughter of Emmeline and granddaughter of Sylvia Pankhurst. Based on the findings of her new book Deeds Not Words. The Story of Women’s Rights – Then and Now Helen will reflect on continuity and change in women's lives since 1918, the year that some women gained the right to vote in Parliamentary elections and stand as MPs.

Rise Up, Women! The Remarkable Lives of the Suffragettes by Diane Atkinson


Christabel Pankhurst - a talk by Professor June Purvis.



A powerful orator, with her cry ‘Rise up women!’ she mobilised thousands of women to join the campaign. A co-founder of the Women’s Party in 1917, she stood unsuccessfully for election to Parliament after certain categories of women were granted the vote in 1918, and then became a successful preacher and writer, especially in the USA, of Second Adventism.

June Purvis is Emeritus Professor of Women’s and Gender History at the University of Portsmouth, specialising in the suffragette movement in Edwardian Britain. Her many publications include Emmeline Pankhurst: a biography (2002) and the newly published Christabel Pankhurst: a biography. She is the editor of the international journal Women’s History Review and Chair of the Women’s History Network. She appears frequently on TV and radio, was one of the historical advisers for the feature film Suffragette (2015) and writes for the popular history press, such as BBC History Magazine and History Today.

This talk was part of Women's History Month 2018

Prime Minister's Questions: 13 March 2019 - Brexit, knife crime, school funding and more...



Find out more: https://www.parliament.uk/business/news/2019/march/prime-ministers-questions-13-march-2019-/

Question Time in the House of Commons is an opportunity for MPs to question government ministers about matters for which they are responsible.

Prime Minister's Question Time, also referred to as PMQs, takes place every Wednesday that the House of Commons is sitting and gives MPs the chance to put questions to the Prime Minister.

In most cases, the session starts with a routine 'open question' from an MP about the Prime Minister's engagements. MPs can then ask supplementary questions on any subject, often one of current political significance.

The Leader of the Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn asks six questions and the leader of the second largest opposition party asks two.

You can follow https://twitter.com/HouseofCommons for official news and information for the UK House of Commons Chamber.

Benefit cap: Emma's story



MPs on the Work and Pensions Committee have been hearing from benefit claimants who have been impacted by the benefit cap. We wanted to share these stories with you.

You can find out more about these and other stories here:
https://houseofcommons.shorthandstories.com/benefitcapstories/index.html

Find out more about the work of the committee here
https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/work-and-pensions-committee/

Benefit cap: Jo's story



MPs on the Work and Pensions Committee have been hearing from benefit claimants who have been impacted by the benefit cap. We wanted to share these stories with you.

You can find out more about these and other stories here:
https://houseofcommons.shorthandstories.com/benefitcapstories/index.html

Find out more about the work of the committee here https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/work-and-pensions-committee/